BLOG
SESC case archive


08/02/2013 | Bovine
1

Not always cysticercosis

The differential diagnosis of a lesion like this one should include:

  • Bovine cysticercosis: First! The appearance of the lesion is compatible with a parasite vesicle. See entry on bovine cysticercosis.
  • Other inflammatory lesions: Bacterial or Sarcocystis spp.
  • Congenital cysts: Typically located in the valves.
  • Neoplasms.

Although the macroscopic image was suggestive of bovine cysticercosis, the histopathological study showed that it was a benign mesenchymal neoplastic proliferation, being in this case the most likely differential diagnosis a  myocardial adenomatoid tumor.

The two halves of the nodule (arrows) located in the wall of the left ventricle make prominence after cutting.

The two halves of the nodule (arrows) located in the wall of the left ventricle make prominence after cutting.

Another view of the lesion (arrow) in the myocardium.

Another view of the lesion (arrow) in the myocardium.

Image of the nodule at higher magnification. Its prominence is evident after its sagittal section and also the important finding that there is no inflammatory reaction around it (usual in Cysticercosis cases).

Image of the nodule at higher magnification. Its prominence is evident after its sagittal section and also the important finding that there is no inflammatory reaction around it (usual in Cysticercosis cases).



1 comment(s)


  1. SESC
    06/05/2014

    Comment from our LinkedIn group:

    By Yves Robinson
    Veterinary pathologist chez Canadian Food Inspection Agency

    We have seen bovine myocardial epithelial inclusions in suspect cases of bovine cysticercosis.
    The lesions are single or multiple, well circumscribed and found in the ventricular wall. Are made of squamous to cuboidal epithelial cells that form tubular, ductular, and acinar structures.
    Ref. Baker et al. Vet Pathol. 30:82-88,1993

Add Comment

Your email address will not be published.




Enter Captcha